The Confiscation of Matthew Leander Patton's Farm - Fort Loudoun, Pennsylvania

The house that stands at Fort Loudoun, PA today is the 3rd house of Matthew Patton, the first two having been burned down by local Native Americans. His property/farm was then confiscated by the British in 1756 as their headquarters in the territory. (There is a letter for viewing at the Courthouse in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA whereby Matthew Patton sues the British Government for the taking of his land and I have witnessed this document). 

Below is an account of John Armstrong's assessment of the Patton farm.
The news that the Fort Loudoun site had been selected is found in a letter from John Armstrong to Governor William Denny, dated November 19, 1756:

"According to the yr Honour’s Orders I have carefully examined Barr’s place, and could not find in it a proper Situation for a Fort, the soil being too Strong to admit the Ditch, and the Spot it self, Overlook’s by an adjoining Hill, but has fixed on a place in neighborhood near Parnell’s Knab where one Patton lived, the Spot I hope will be very agreeable to your Honour and to Mr. Myer, and as its near the New Road, will make the distance from Shippensburgh to Fort Lyttleton two Miles Shorter than by McDowel’s."

The letter continues:

“I’m making the best preparation in my power to forward the New Fort, as well as to prepare the Barracks, &c, all the others for the Approaching Winter. Yesterday the Escort of one hundred men returned from Lyttleton who left the Chattle &c, safe there and to-day we begin to Digg a Cellar in the New Fort; the Loggs & Roof of a New House having there been Erected by Patton before the Indians burn’s his Old One. We shall first apprise this House, and then take the benefit of it, either for Officers Barracks or a Store House, by which means the Provisions may the sooner be mov’d from this place (McDowell’s Mill) which at present divides our strength."
(Protecting the Frontier - Fort Loudoun's Brief Life, Fort Loudoun - 1756 British Fort,, accessed 23 Dec, 2017)
The fort history reported that the land was deserted by the British in 1765, and Patton returned to successfully reclaim his land. 



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